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Switzerland strongly benefits from the EU single market

Switzerland strongly benefits from the EU single market

this was the result of a on Wednesday published a study by the Bertelsmann Foundation, two weeks before the European elections. The largest economy in the world increases, therefore, the income of the EU citizens, per head and year, average of about 840 Euro.

Switzerland is with 2914 Euro income plus at the top of the leaderboard. Luxembourg (2834 euros), and Ireland (1894 Euro). In the particular winners and also Belgium, Austria, the Netherlands.

France (1074 EUR) and Germany (1046 euros) expensive still belong to the Top Ten professional. Lower growth in countries with lower competitiveness, such as Spain, Portugal or Greece, with around 600 to 400 Euro per Person and year.

in all 28 EU-countries studied, the impact of regional differences. “Not everyone benefits equally, but all win,” said Foundation Executive Aart de Geus. The single market was “the biggest driver for our prosperity”.

The authors believe that, overall, EU-wide, around 420 billion euros in income growth per year through the 1993 internal market. In Germany, the biggest Plus could be dropped – in aggregate are approximately 86 billion Euro. Basically, especially in countries and regions with a high export orientation and heavy industry were among the winners.

What are the gains of the reasons for the Income? The Elimination of customs duties and other obstacles to let the trade grow, explain the authors. There is more competition, which would have a positive impact on production and prices. Trade costs are lowered. The internal market in the mountains-still plenty of potential for further wealth gains, especially in services trade, so the Foundation in Gütersloh.

The forthcoming Brexit forecast study co-author Dominic Ponattu, a complete exit of the British from the internal market, the country would hit hard. This applies particularly to the greater London area and the residents in the industry – and innovation-intensive southern regions.