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Hong Kong’s China extradition plan could violate key US trade act provisions

Hong Kong’s China extradition plan could violate key US trade act provisions

Hong Kong’s proposed extradition law amendments could violate key provisions of the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which affords the city privileges in economic and trade matters relating to the US, according to a report from a Washington congressional committee. The rules allow Hong Kong to be treated as a separate territory to mainland China.

Tuesday’s report from the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC) said the proposals could breach provisions of the Act contingent upon Hong Kong’s autonomy under the One Country Two Systems framework, such as determining whether the city is “legally competent” to carry out its treaty obligations. These duties include ensuring US businesses can operate in Hong Kong according to applicable local and US law.

Hong Kong’s proposed extradition law amendments could violate key provisions of the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992, which affords the city privileges in economic and trade matters relating to the US, according to a report from a Washington congressional committee. The rules allow Hong Kong to be treated as a separate territory to mainland China.

Tuesday’s report from the US-China Economic and Security Review Commission (USCC) said the proposals could breach provisions of the Act contingent upon Hong Kong’s autonomy under the One Country Two Systems framework, such as determining whether the city is “legally competent” to carry out its treaty obligations. These duties include ensuring US businesses can operate in Hong Kong according to applicable local and US law.

The USCC report highlighted recent moves to push through the proposal in the face of broad opposition from various sectors of society. In March, the American Chamber of Commerce expressed “serious concern” about the plan despite government concessions on nine white-collar offences.