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Home / Uncategorized / Black seadevil anglerfish shown on a breathtaking video of 2,000ft under sea
Black seadevil anglerfish shown on a breathtaking video of 2,000ft under sea

Black seadevil anglerfish shown on a breathtaking video of 2,000ft under sea

LONDON: Recently a black seadevil anglerfish exposed on a wonderful new video that is a extraordinary as it is attractive. This menacing creature found live on tape has been worryingly portrayed in such movies as “Finding Nemo,” but this newest footage of 2,000 feet under the ocean is really a sight to see.

News Max reveals that the anglerfish is unique in that males will literally “drown” if it does not find a female to attach to for sustenance.
A black seadevil anglerfish was recently discovered on a breathtaking new video that is rare as it is interesting. This menacing creature found live on tape has been ominously portrayed in such movies as “Finding Nemo,” but this latest footage 2,000 feet beneath the ocean is truly a sight to see. News Max reveals this Monday, November 24, 2014, that the anglerfish is unique in that males will literally “drown” if it does not find a female to attach to for sustenance.

Clown fish like Marlin had better swim for cover, as a black seadevil anglerfish has been spotted in a rare new video that has the public watching in excitement. A team of scientists managed to spot this intimidating, uncommon animal deep in the waters below Monterey Canyon. As seen in the featured clip above, the menacing creature was located over 2,000 feet under the sea’s surface, and has a unique “glow light” on its head to attract prey.

Although the differences between the males and females of these species will be discussed later in the article, this frightening-looking anglerfish is said to remain in deep waters where sunlight cannot reach. As a result, this particular fish is particularly difficult to snap photos of, let alone record live on camera.
We’ve been diving out here in the Monterey Canyon regularly for 25 years, and we’ve seen three (black seadevils),” Bruce Robison, a leading official for chairman of an aquarium’s research institute, shared in a statement. Such a small number is testament to this creature’s rarity.

Yet the menacing black seadevil anglerfish is certainly skilled in capturing prey and continuing the species’ line, despite its scarcity. Using a unique form of bioluminescence, the creature of the deep manages to use a makeshift, natural “flashlight” from a stalk on its head that draws potential prey close. The large fish then uses its massive jaws, sharp set of teeth, and impressive sucking abilities to draw in squid, fish, and related prey to eat.